Friday, October 19, 2012

Slow-cooker (not so) Refried Beans

I honestly had no idea the you could make refried beans at home. Or at least I never really thought about it. It's most likely because I am probably the only person in the world who actually enjoys re-fried beans from a can, Rosarita vegetarian refried beans to be specific (which coincidentally have the exact same ingredient list as the ones not specifically marked vegetarian).

Maggie's Mind Mumbles//: Slow-Cooker (not so) Refried Beans

I pinned a while back a tutorial for cooking dried beans in the slow cooker over at Budget Bytes. As I was reading through it for the garbanzo beans I used in the Butternut Squash Autumn Stew, I noticed a recipe in the side-bar for "not refried beans." I was intrigued so I clicked the link. I guess you can't really call these "refried" or even "fried," because they are cooked in the slow-cooker. But they do taste very like refried beans. In fact, I think they taste better because they aren't weighed down with a million pounds of lard (actually there is no fat added).

The story actually starts about a month ago. I bought this bag of pinto beans because it was $2.00.


That's right, that says 4lbs. So I had this bag of beans with not really a clue what I should do with it. And that's when I discover the not re-fried beans recipe. It was fate. So I measure out the 2 cups of beans required for this recipe and got creative with my storage of the remaining 3 pounds (2 cups of beans equals 1 pounds, in case you were wondering. Now you know).


So, since it's Food Fun Friday, I will now instruct you in the delicate art and science of slow-cooker beans. Measure out 2 cups of beans (1 pound). Sort and wash the beans, then chop up one medium-sized onion and add it to the slow-cooker.


Then add 2 minced garlic cloves, 1 tsp cumin, 1/2 teaspoon chili powder and 1 tsp black pepper.


Next, add the sorted and washed beans along with 6 cups of water and, say it with me now "Set it and forget it." (Set it: low, forget it: 8 hours or 4-5 hours on high). Return to a heavenly smell and this:


Removed some of the liquid (about 1 1/2 cups) to make it easier to mash the beans. Then using a potato masher start smooshing (this is a technical term) the beans. You could also use a hand mixer.


Smoosh until there are only a few recognizable beans remaining. Then store it all in airtight containers.



The original recipe says that this make about the same amount as 3 cans, but this quantity shouldn't scare you because it is freezable. It was wonderful in the burrito I had for dinner (There really is no better taste than re-fried beans and melted cheese). It would be a perfect layer in 7-layer dip or by itself with tortilla chips.

Burrito Making 101:

Spread the beans
Sprinkle the cheese
 Broil on lo in the oven for about 10 minutes

Enjoy every bite!