Friday, August 31, 2012

Heart Friendship Bracelet

Maggie's Mind Mumbles//: Heart Pattern Friendship Bracelet


When I was an adorable, little, red-headed girl, with fat cheeks, and freckles in numbers rivaling stars in the sky (okay I still look like that ;) ) I was a Girl Scout. I went to Girl Scout day camp and Girl Scout overnight camp and Girl Scout meetings (and I sold Girl Scout cookies!). While I learned many the great things they teach you in Girl Scouts, one thing I will probably never be able to forget is how to make friendship bracelets. That muscle memory stuff is great isn’t it, especially considering friendship bracelets are now sold in store (what?) for $15 (what?!).

So, since we all know just how much I love making things myself I will go through the mantra again:
  1. you get to choose your own preference…
  2. you spend less money… and
  3. you form a deeper connection with the things you own because you crafted it with your own two hands.

This tutorial walks you through the steps of making a friendship bracelet with a heart pattern. Enjoy!

To start you need to cut your strings. Pick two colors. Hold your arms straight out perpendicular to your body, from fingertip to fingertip is how long your string should be. Cut four strands, two for each color. Fold the string in half take the fold and make a knot close to the end. This loop will be used to clasp the bracelet, so make it small but big enough that a knot can go through.


embroidery floss, heart pattern, friendship bracelet

Tape your strings down to a flat surface (or if your old school  safety pin then to your jeans), so that it is tightly secured. Order your strings the same as in the image above. Whichever color is on the outside will be the color of your hearts. Number the position of the strings from left to right 1-8.

Now, I would like to explain the knot… There is the going left knot and the going right knot.

*Tip: The illustrations below show on top both knots going forward and below that one knot going forward and one going backward. I noticed that two of my heart strings got more use than the other two. When you are knotting one pink around another, you can switch the dominant strings using the bottom illustration knot.


embroidery floss, heart pattern, friendship bracelet

To go right take the string in the number one position, lay it over the second string take it back under the second string and pull it through the loop.


embroidery floss, heart pattern, friendship bracelet

Going left is the same process as going right; only you wrap the eighth string around the seventh string in the opposite direction.

Each time you make a knot you will do this knot twice.


embroidery floss, heart pattern, friendship bracelet

  1. Like I said you will have your string laid out in the order shown.

  2. Take string 1 and knot it twice around string 2 then string 3 and finally 4. Then, take string 8 and knot it around string 7, string 6 and finally string 5. Finally knot the middle strings together (going left or right, it doesn’t matter)

  3. Follow the same steps as above for the next row with the second color.

  4. Now take the second string and knot it going left around the first string and the seventh string going right around the eighth.

  5. Fill in the space by taking the second string and knotting it (going right) around strings 3 and 4 and the seventh string (going left) around strings 6 and 5.

  6. Now again take the second string and knot it going left around the first string and the seventh string going right around the eighth.

  7. Fill in the space again by taking the second string and knotting it (going right) around strings 3 and 4 and the seventh string (going left) around strings 6 and 5.

  8. Knot string 1 and 2-4 (going right) and string 8 around 7-5 (going left). This is step 1 again completing the heart.

  9. Repeat step 2-8 until the bracelet is the length you like (I usually do about 52 rows).

Now that you know the basic you can do many patterns. Try one on the friendship bracelet website.


"Make new Friends but keep the old, one is silver and the other's gold. A circle's round, it has no end. That's how long I want to be your friend."

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

President Obama Addresses Colorado Students About 2012 Election

Maggie's Mind Mumbles//: President Obama Addresses Colorado Students


President Obama came to visit Colorado State University on August 28th. He was here in 2008 and I just barely missed him. He was a senator running for president back then. I was a scared freshman, and the Oval was outside of the comfortable bubble I had created for myself (dorm room, classes, Lory Student Center, and Corbett dining hall).



This time around I was determined to see him. My President Obama adventures began around 10:30 am on August 27th. That’s when I just happened to walk by a girl handing out tickets on my way to carry out a completely different mission (Print flyers for the first meeting for the CSU Range Club). She was just setting up so I didn’t even have to wait in line to get this shiny blue ticket.

Behind the scenes photos:


 
Obama's Helicopter via @EllyCollins


 
Security via @SarahJaneKyle


 
Secret Service via @SarahJaneKyle


Behind these curtains you can find metal detectors and a weaving maze on metal barricades to organize the line of people.

The next stages of this adventure to see President Obama’s speech did not quite go according to plan. First off, I should have realized that the people I passed at 10:00am (some people camped out all night) were clever, instead of scoffing at their time-wasting ways.



Secondly, I should have brought my ticket to school with me this morning instead of leaving it in my lunch box (yes, I am such a logical thinker). My poor boyfriend, Reid, was napping (he works nights now), and I woke him up to bring my ticket between classes.

Third, I should have brought sunscreen and a hat and a parasol and a sunshade and a fan and about 8 gallons of water! It was approximately 5,000 degrees and standing in line in direct sunlight in that kind of heat is probably what death feels like (if you died in the desert of heat stroke and dehydration), especially if your not even sure if it will all pay off.

Fourth, I should have left my backpack with Reid when he brought the ticket instead of lugging it with me to the back of the loooooooong line (My estimates say it was at least a mile long).


 
Map courtesy of Google Maps
  • Blue box indicates location of speakers
  • Red box indicates security
  • Black line indicates direction of line (Where it ends on East dr. is not necessarily the end, this is just where I lost track of it.)
  • Yellow star indicates where I got into the line
  • Orange star indicates where I left it
*Please Note: Colors have no correlation to party.

After 30 minutes of waiting in line (I moved probably 20 feet in that time, at least I made it to some shade), I was told that IF I made it to the front they would probably send me to a separate line to check my bag before sending me BACK to the back of the line.

I had nowhere to take my backpack AND my phone was dead. The extremely nice woman in front of me in line told me she would save my place in line if I wanted to run home to drop it off. She gave me her phone number and told me to call when I returned in order to find her. She joked that she would be hard to find, about 10 feet away from our current position in the 45 minutes it would take for me to return.




 
There was a squirrel in this tree. I thought I got it in the picture but it must be a vampire. (squiracula)

So I left my place…



…chugged a bottle of the free H2Obama (witty)…



… snapped this photo of the Elvis selling Obama buttons. I also saw a man selling Baronco shirts (Barack + Broncos = Baronco?)… and rode my bike home.

I was so hot when I got home that I felt defeated and like I never wanted to return to that horrible line. I resigned my self to homework for the night.

My sister, Erica then told me that she had green priority tickets, which gave me a second wind (with priority tickets you don’t have to wait as long in line). I called my friend that was saving my spot in line to tell her that I wouldn’t be returning and thanked her for her kindness. We decided to meet up at Wild Boar Coffee, a coffee shop across the street from campus.



Images inside the Quad:


 


 


 
Via Nick Lyon of the Rocky Mountain Collegian


 


 

A few highlights from the speeches:


 

John Hickenlooper, Governor for Colorado, states, “Barack Obama has your back. Do we have his back?” He then goes on to say “President Obama has more emotional depth than anyone I have ever known, and we are lucky to have him as our president.”


 

Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior, asks, “ Who will be the champion for the middle class? Obama, or the other guy who stands for the top 2%.” He also informs us, “It’s Barack Obama that helped you get into higher education.”

CSU Sophomore Haley Damm-Hamblin introduces the president. Her speech represented her background as a young woman going to university and why this election is important to her.


 

Finally, Obama takes the stage, and he got me just a jazzed as he always does when I hear him speak. One of his major points throughout the speech was the importance of voting. He encourages us to vote saying, “Your vote will decide where we go from here,” and “You choose the path to get to the future.”

When he says that in the next few weeks his opponent will share his agenda, the crowd boos, to which he says, “Don’t boo. Vote. That’s the best response. Vote, and get some of your friends to vote.” He mentions an online voter registry, GottaVote.com, which he emphasizes the spelling and apologizes to English professors ;) . He then says, “Young people came out in record numbers four years ago." and "Understand your power. If you're going to get cynical, wait till you're older." (hahahaha)

A great moment was when Obama listed all the things WE accomplished in the last four years and a guy yells, “You helped!” to which Obama replies, “I helped a little bit” Hahaha Classic.

He puts the power in our hands, “If we win Colorado, we will win this election. If we win Fort Collins, we will win Colorado.” and “America is counting on you and I’m counting on you.”  Pressure’s on! President Obama is counting on ME!


Via Nick Lyon of the Rocky Mountain Collegian

Another key point in President Obama’s speech was the power of education. He tells us that Mitt Romeny calls us the lost generation but we are not because Obama believes in us: “I believe in you. I believe in the American people. I've seen the passion of this generation.”

He goes on to say that he and First Lady, Michelle paid off their student loans about 8 years ago. He says, “We know what its like.” He emphasizes his commitment to higher education saying that we shouldn’t be making it harder for students to pay off loans than it already is. My question for you: Should we keep college affordable or borrow money from our parents (as Romney suggests)?


Via Nick Lyon of the Rocky Mountain Collegian

A third point emphasized in his speech was ObamaCare, Obama explains that “We passed this law because I care.” ObamaCare has provided 7,000,000 young people with healthcare, given woman access to health care such as birth control, mammograms and pap smears, and has made medicine more accessible to the elderly. "Some of us can't afford the healthcare we need sometimes, no matter how well we plan."

A particularly funny moment in my opinion was the reference to the “Romney-Doesn’t-Care plan,” the health care system we will be left with should Romney be elected.


Via Nick Lyon of the Rocky Mountain Collegian

President Obama also discusses the economy and jobs. Obama says that tax cuts should not be given to those who have already succeeded (if success is measured monetarily) saying, “Tax cuts should be given to the middle-class, small business and students not to those who have already made it.” He wants to "build the economy from the inside out.” “It’s about the middle class and students." (Hey that’s me!)

Obama tells us that his opponent believes, “Renewable sources of energy are imaginary,” Obama asks, “Do we want to be forever dependent on foreign oil or do we want to pursue renewable, clean energy sources?” and that “Renewable energy is the future.”

Obama explains, "Here's the bottom line, Colorado. If the other side has their way ... it wont create jobs." and "I want to make sure taxes are not raised a single dime on first $250k of income."


 

A few other great points from Obama include, “Help every American have a chance to better themselves.” “We don’t need to refight the battles of the past, we are moving forward, we don't go backward!” Obama is not going to leave any Americans out in the cold, that’s what we’re fighting for.

He questions why people who love each other can’t get married. His response, “The history of our country is not about how many people we can exclude.” and "Ignoring inequality doesn't make it go away."

Obama on veterans: "We're going to have to serve them just as well as they've served us."

He includes some inspirational ideas such as: “You gotta get on board. Its time for change!” (which was responded to by the crowd with a resounding, “Yes we can!”) One of his themes was that he hasn’t finished what’s he’s started, “We've got more work to do!” (To which the crowd began chanting, “Four more years!”). And he tells us, "We are greater together than we are on our own."


He exited to a little Bruce Springsteen, “We take care of our own."


 



(My dumb ole video of the motorcade from Wild Boar Coffee after the speech. Sorry I didn't follow the limo. I was looking at it but my hands didn't cooperate.)
“Will this be an America where no matter where no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter who you love, no matter what your last name is, you can pursue happiness?"

As a young person, I feel that Obama understands me. As a student, I believe that Obama appreciate me. As a Natural Resources student specifically, I recognize that Obama values me. As a woman, I know that Obama supports me. I am grateful that I can look back on today as a piece of history that I participated in, and I hope one day this piece of history will be considered the day everything changed.

*UPDATE: Today is a new day and the Rocky Mountain Collegian (CSU's student newspaper) has some interesting articles and things to say about Obama's visit, that I would like to address.

This article compares Obama's 2012 campaign with FDR's campaign in which he has re-elected for four terms due to the creation of the New Deal. These government programs forced Americans to rely on the government for their basic needs. I disagree with this comparison. While Obama did mention that he wants to finish the work he's started, the programs he has introduced are not forced on every American, they give chances to every American. The choice to take these opportunities is left up to the individual.

An article by Caleb Hendrich with the title, "Don't Boo Get Out and Vote," discusses why Obama is focused on getting more votes. Apparently, historically the greater the turn-out of voters the more likely the Democratic party has been to have a victory in both the executive and legislative branches. An interesting point.

While the editorial rejoices in the 13,000 people showing up to support the democratic process, their view is that the fate of the nation does not ride on one day in history or the results of the election in November. They want to encourage people to monitor the government in order to ensure that what is promised also is put into effect.

At the time of Obama's speech there was a smallish (comparatively) gathering of Mitt Romney supporters who met at the corner of University and Meridian Avenues. A report in the collegian quotes one of their number in response to the idea of repealing ObamaCare, " The idea that the government can force you to buy something scares me." My response to you sir: "Where do you think roads and highways, public schools, wildlife protection, national monuments, public transportation, public libraries, open space protection, wetland protection, etc. etc. come from? Your tax dollars, that's where. You've been forced to "buy" things your whole life. Even if you don't use these things every day or they will not benefit you directly, you have to pay for them. ObamaCare simply creates an opportunity for some people in the same way all the other public service we know and love do.



Did you catch President Obama’s speech? What do you like, or dislike, about Obama’s campaign? Romney’s? Are you registered to vote? (Register here)

Monday, August 27, 2012

Starbucks Passion Tea Lemonade

As you probably know by now I love summertime and I have a lot of favorite things about summer. It'll be at least four more posts before I stop saying THIS is my favorite thing about summer so bear with me. I love going to Starbucks in the summer for a grande passion tea lemonade with one pump; it's a guilty pleasure. But I don't love the price that could very easily empty my bank account.


Maggie's Mind Mumbles//:  Make it at Home - Starbucks Passion Tea Lemonade

SO I asked them what tea they use in their passion tea lemonade and they told me (It's Tazo the Starbucks tea brand and they actually sell it at the store).




You can get this kind that's iced tea ready (make a bunch at once and store it in the pitcher in the fridge). Or they sell a box of individual servings (make it one cup at a time). At Target it was $4.95 (same as a box at Starbucks) but in an online search I found it for a little cheaper.

After drinking it a little I realized it was very similar to the Celestial Seasonings tea I bought at the factory for $2.85.



The Celestial Seasonings version is already sweetened using Stevia, which I'm still not completely sold on but my research tells me that the claims are true. I'll let you make up your own mind about it.

Anyway, to make the Starbucks version of the delicious pink drink is quite simple. Make the tea according to the package, juice some lemons, add a little of your preferred sweetener (if you like it sweetened), chill in the fridge, enjoy!





Friday, August 24, 2012

Shoot the Moon

Billie Letts give us another novel full of small-town charm, a little mystery, and some romance in her novel Shoot the Moon. Dr. Mark Albright, a veterinarian to the stars of Hollywood, discovers that he was adopted shortly after the death of his father. He heads to DeClare, Oklahoma in hopes of discovering his birth parents, and quickly discovers that the story of his past is a bit of a mystery.


book cover, book review, shoot the moon, billie letts, mystery, oklahoma 
Source: http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/books_9780446695060.htm

Gaylene Harjo, the woman Mark knows to be his mother, was murdered when Mark, or Nicky Jack Harjo, was a baby. Most people assumed Nicky Jack had been killed as well, but the body was never found. The wrong man was arrested for the murder, and took his own life while in prison. When Mark returns claiming to be the long lost baby, it causes quite a stir around town.

I don’t want to give too much away but the central characters also include Ivy and Teeve Harjo who take Mark under their wing, helping him in his investigation. Oliver Boyd  “O Boy” Daniels is the rather nasty local sheriff. His wife is Carrie and they have a son, Kippy, who is not much older than Mark. O Boy’s half-brother Arthur McFaddon is another not very nice character who runs the local radio with his stepson Kyle. I especially enjoyed the domino boys, a group of four geezers who play domino’s at Teeve’s pool hall. They add humor and character to the novel.

We learn about Gaylene’s life through snippets of her diary, which Letts has woven seamlessly into the fabric of her story. Her childhood friend was Rowena Whitekiller, she worked at Arthur’s radio station with Kyle and she played basketball well enough to get a scholarship for university.

While this novel is another great work of Letts’, I found it somewhat predictable, considering I had the mystery pretty much solved about halfway through the book. Even so, I still took pleasure in the journey and would definitely recommend this story to anyone who likes fast-moving, well-told novels crafted with wit.

What is your opinion of Shoot the Moon?

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Origami Gift Box


Origami box, paper, gift box, recycled magazine


We all know that giftwrap can be expensive. I don’t want to spend as much (or more) on the paper, bag, and bow as I did on what’s inside. In the past I have been known to make the wrapping as much a part of the gift as what’s inside by using a purse, basket or tote bag. I also like to “be green,” so to speak and recycle old newspaper and magazines as wrapping paper. This is a tutorial on making gift boxes from magazine pages.


Origami box, paper, gift box, recycled magazine

What you’ll need:
  • Scissors
  • Paper
  • Ruler
  • Glue-stick (optional)


Origami box, paper, gift box, recycled magazine

  1. Find some paper with a pretty design. The paper must be a perfect square, cut off extra length to make it a square. I used a magazine page (doubled up with a second page glued to the back for sturdiness). Pay attention to what is at the center of the square when cutting, this will be the top of the box.

  2. Place the pretty side face down. Fold the square on the diagonal in half, both ways.

  3. With the pretty side down fold each corner into the center to make a small square.

  4. Unfold two opposite corners. Taking the edges that are still folded down, fold again lining the edge up with the tip of the corner. Do this for the opposite side. Then fold down the other two corners and repeat.

  5. Unfold all folds. Find the creases of the small square at the very center of your paper. Lightly draw the outline on the not pretty side of your paper to make sure you don’t over cut in the next step.

  6. Cut in from the edge of the paper along the creases as shown in image 6 above. Don’t over cut.

  7. Fold along all crease on the sides with tabs (triangles) as shown.

  8. Fold the final two edges over the tabs and press down to “stick.”

  9. True origami doesn’t need glue but since this is a gift I didn’t want the sides to pop up so I glue down the corners. You can also cut out a small square of pretty paper that fits in the box and glue that over the corners. You can see that I did that in the image below.


Origami box, paper, gift box, recycled magazine

If you want to make a box with a lid the lid paper needs to be slightly larger than the bottom. My box is about 2 1/4” when completed. The bottom was 6” and the top was 6 1/4”. If you want a bigger box (about 4 1/4") use 12” for the top and 11 1/2” for the bottom; for a smaller box (about 1 3/4") use 5” for the top and 4 13/16” for the bottom.

If you forget how to do proportions here is a link to a calculator.

Plug in 2.25 (the size of my completed box) on the top of the fraction to the left and 6 (the size of the bottom paper) on the bottom of the fraction on the left.

Plug in the size you want your box to be on the top of the fraction on the left. The equation will return the size you should cut your bottom piece.

Then plug in 6 and 6.25 on the fraction on the left and whatever number you got back from the previous step. Now the equation will tell you how big to cut the top piece.

Or you could just guess... testing on scratch paper never hurt anyone.

Origami box, paper, gift box, recycled magazine


Monday, August 20, 2012

Edamame Hummus

Hummus is one of the best things in life, and adding a few soybeans can only help. The first time I had edamame hummus was my freshman year at CSU. There was always some hummus at the salad bar and very rarely they served edamame hummus. Those were good days, but now I make it at home whenever I want.



Gather your ingredients: some edamame hummus recipes use only soybeans and no chickpeas, but I love chickpeas so I use both, tahini is optional but tastes yummy (I didn’t have any), ¼ cup water, lemon zest and juice, smashed garlic, salt, cumin, coriander and olive oil.




Boil the edamame (fun fact: edamame is actually the Japanese word for soybeans in the shell, when you buy shelled soybeans they’re actually called, "mukimame") according to package directions. Drain and add to a blender or food processor.




Add the drained chickpeas to the blender or food processor.




I’ve never figured out if it’s easier to zest first and juice after or vice versa. I juice first. Roll the lemon on the counter to loosen the juices before cutting it in half and juicing it.

Then add the water, lemon zest and juice and olive oil (I used 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 tablespoon sesame oil to add a little of that sesame flavor since I didn’t have tahini)… Followed by the tahini (if using) garlic, salt, cumin, and coriander.



Pulse the blender or food processor until smooth. Add more water if mixture is too thick; add more soy beans if it's too runny. Taste test and adjust spices to preference.



Serve with vegetables, pita chips, pretzels, or whatever you fancy. This stuff is blended gold my friends. :) AND now you have another dip to serve at your next St. Patrick's Day party (besides guacamole I mean). Yay!






Total Time: 15 minutesDifficulty: EasyYield: 1 ¼ cup

Ingredients:
  • 1 ½ cup frozen shelled green soybeans
  • 1 can drained chickpeas
  • ¼ cup tahini (optional)
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest
  • 1 lemon (about 3 tablespoons), juiced
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon ground coriander
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Suggested serving: Sliced cucumbers, celery, olives, and pita

Directions:
Boil the beans in salted water for 4 to 5 minutes, or microwave, covered, for 2 to 3 minutes. In a food processor, puree the edamame, tahini, water, lemon zest and juice, garlic, salt, cumin, and coriander until smooth. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and mix until absorbed. Transfer to a small bowl, stir in the parsley and drizzle with remaining oil. Serve with the suggested vegetables, or refrigerate, covered, up to 1 week (this time is very finicky, check for signs of spoilage such as ingredient separation, off taste or smell and slimy appearance).

Friday, August 17, 2012

Night

For the longest time I refused to read Night by Elie Wiesel. I kept telling myself that it was just another heart-breaking story of a young boy who lived through the Holocaust. I didn’t want to face the unsettling and depressing account that has haunted my bookshelf all these years. Eventually I realized that hiding from something doesn’t make it go away, in fact, it usually gets worse. If every person on this planet denies the stories of these people and avoids talking and thinking about that horrible time, what’s to stop it from happening again? So I read it.


night, ellie wiesel, book cover, book review, holocaust 
Source: http://judesenglish10.blogspot.com/2012/02/review-of-night-by-elie-wiesel.html

The story follows Eliezer (a character invented to distance the author from the experience) through his experiences in Auschwitz, Buna, and Gleiwitz. His experiences jump out and possess the reader. We follow his complicated love-hate relationship with a God that has abandoned God’s most devoted followers. We wonder with him why the rest of the world remained silent in the face of such brutality. We see inhumanity toward other humans through the eyes of one who experienced it. We celebrate the beautiful father-son relationship while regretting that this relationship results in a sacrifice.


I don’t really know what else to say about this book except that it was exactly what I expected: gloomy, heartbreaking, horrifying, and shocking. It’s not a good book since the events that take place within these pages are certainly not good, but it is well written and worth reading. It is bleak and blunt; Elie Wiesel does not hold back in the recounting of his tale.


How did you react to Night?

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Fruit by the (almost) Foot

As a kid I was a huge fan of fruit gummies like Fruit by the Foot, Fruit Roll-Ups and Fruit Gushers (though I very rarely received them at home). Now, that I’m an adult (sorta) I have had a few cravings for them.

If you take a look at a box of strawberry flavored Fruit By the Foot by Betty Crocker you might see these ingredients:

From the name you would assume there’d be a lot of fruit in it but actually you find it’s just sugar and preservatives. It’s number four on a list of 9 Kid Foods to Avoid created by Time.

Here is a recipe for fruit leather from Out of the Box Food. Tastes delicious, not too difficult to make, and you can adjust the amount of sweetener, the flavor, and the size to suit your fancy. I am seriously in love with homemade stuff!


I got mixed berries because… berries. Other fruit combinations can be found at the end of this post. I used agave nectar because it doesn't add much flavor but honey or maple syrup can be used as well (or none of the above).


Start by cutting the two sheets of parchment paper to fit the cookie sheets. Rub some butter on the paper so the rolls will peel off easily and set them aside. I'm not sure how necessary the greasing step is but I am afraid to test these without it.


Add all ingredients to the blender (not the butter, like I said it’s for greasing).


Then blend the heck outta those fruits!


At this point you could strain the puree to remove the seeds (there are soooo many seeds). I didn't because I like to keep things simple and don't like washing dishes... These are life-changing decisions, my friends. Divide the puree evenly between the two cookie sheets and spread thin with a rubber spatula.


This is my third time making these and I elected to use the sun to dry them in order to save energy. I was worried about bugs and stuff but then I decided to not worry about bugs and stuff. If you do worry about bugs, heat the oven to 150 °F (or as low as yours goes) and place the two cookie sheets in the oven as it is heating up. If your oven has a convection setting this would be an excellent occasion to use it. If you're lucky enough to have one this recipe is perfect for a dehydrator. My oven only goes to 170 °F so the first time I made these I let the oven heat up all the way gave it five minutes and turned it off. After 20 minutes I’d turn it on again. It was very tedious but it worked. The second time I made these I forgot to alternate heating times and the rolls got super crispy around the edges, and pretty much all over, which made me angry.

When the rolls aren’t wet any longer take them out of the oven (or bring them inside). Wait for them to cool, which doesn’t take long, and cut into whatever size and shape you want. I leave the parchment paper on the rolls as I roll them up so it’s on the outside (like a real fruit by the foot). Store in an airtight container. As far as I can tell they last forever if you don’t eat them all at once.

Somewhat of a high maintenance recipe since you really have to be around the whole time they are drying (unless you use the sun and are not worried about bugs or wind, then you can just leave them out all day). One idea is to make these and refrigerate the puree until just after dinner. Turn the oven on until bedtime and turn it off when you go to sleep.

MORE FRUIT COMBINATION IDEAS:
Yellow: 1 fresh mango, 7 oz dried apricots, the juice of one orange
Purple:  20 oz frozen mixed berries and 1 fresh banana
Green: Kiwi, mango and mint leaves
Blue: Blueberries and grape juice
Red: Strawberries and banana

Spices to try: Allspice, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, ginger, mace, mint, basil, extracts, citrus juices and peels, nutmeg or pumpkin pie spice. Use sparingly, start with 1/8 teaspoon for each 2 cups of pureĆ©.



MAKES: 12, 2” x 14” rolls
TIME: Preparation – 10 minutes, Drying – 5 to 7 hours with convection oven; 8 to 10 hours with standard oven; more if drying by sun. Also depends on thickness of puree.

INGREDIENTS:
  • 20 oz. frozen fruit
  • ¼ cup agave nectar, honey, or maple syrup (can use less or omit completely)
  • Butter for greasing
DIRECTIONS:

Cut parchment paper to fit on two cookie sheets with raised edges. Grease parchment paper with butter. Defrost berries and add to blender with sweetener. Blend until smooth. Divide puree between cookie sheets, spread thin with a spatula. Heat oven to 150 °F (my oven only goes down to 170 °F so I watch them carefully so they don’t burn). Another option is to leave rolls out in the sun to dry. Or better yet, use a dehydrator. When fruit is dry remove the cookie sheets from the oven. When cool cut into 2” strips, roll tightly and store in air-tight container.


What flavor combinations have you tried?